Coping with a Sudden or Traumatic Death

Every time you say goodbye to a loved one, you assume that you will see that person again. You don’t expect your loved one to commit suicide or become a homicide victim. Thousands of families endure such an occurrence every year—and they don’t expect it, either. If you should face an unthinkable tragedy, let this guide help you put the pieces of your life back together.

Grieving Widow

Handling Practical Matters

Immediately after a sudden traumatic death, don’t feel as if you need to take care of everything yourself. For example, instead of risking your emotional and physical health by cleaning up the scene, let suicide or homicide clean-up professionals take care of it. If you’re having trouble organizing the funeral or memorial service, enlist the help of friends or family members.

Acknowledging Your Emotions

Funeral services aren’t for the deceased, but for the living. Use the funeral or memorial service as an excuse to relive all your favorite memories and say goodbye to your deceased loved one. Trying to mask your emotions will only cause more grief later—instead, you shouldn’t be afraid to cry, express your anger, or write down your other complicated emotions in a journal. If you can confront these emotions and accept them as a part of your new reality, you can take the first steps toward recovery.

Seeking Support

Though a funeral can provide a sense of closure, it won’t wipe away all your difficult emotions. Instead of letting your loved ones go their separate ways after the funeral, try to keep them close. Spending time together and dealing with grief can help everyone move on. If you’re still having trouble understanding your grief, consider speaking with counselor.

Crime Scene Clean-Up can help you with the most pressing need in the wake of a homicide or suicide—cleaning up the mess left behind. We have over 20 years of experience cleaning up homicide and suicide scenes. Call us at (800) 991-3660 if you have any questions.